Monthly Archives: June 2013

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND Part 4 – the Royal Standard

The Royal Standard is the flag or banner that represents the Sovereign and the United Kingdom. It is flown only when the Sovereign is present and if you see it flying above Buckingham Palace you know the Queen is in residence. Royal protocol is exact and exacting and doesn’t change easily – there are centuries of ritual and history associated with the Royal emblems and ceremonies.

When the idea for CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND began developing into sketches and compositional drawings the work was titled “Royal Standard – A Dream To Die For”. Perhaps this may be the better title … once you see the finished piece let us know what you think.

 Here are just 2 of the many flag studies for CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND:

Sketch for Royal Standard

Sketch for Royal Standard

Sketch for Royal Standard

Sketch for Royal Standard

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CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND Part 3 – the Sovereign’s Sceptre

At English coronation ceremonies symbolic objects are an important part of the ritual and each has a specific meaning. The Sovereign’s Sceptre with cross represents the monarch’s worldly power with the association of good governance. The sceptre is a gold rod surmounted by an enamelled and gem-studded structure, part of which holds the Star of Africa, the largest colourless cut diamond in the world, cleaved from the great 3,106 carat Cullinan Diamond which the government of the Transvaal (South Africa) presented to King Edward VII in 1907 as a gesture of reconciliation after the Boer War … a sort of king-size suck up?

The following image is the sceptre study (which does not include the Star of Africa) for CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND.

Sovereign's Sceptre

Sovereign’s Sceptre

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND Part 2 – hand studies

There’s a magnetic attraction that water has to golf balls – you play a lovely round, driving the ball down every fairway … until you get to the hole with the water. That ball is magnetised and dunks itself in the drink every time! It’s the same with drawing the human figure: you make a good study until you get to a hand and spoil things by managing little more than a poorly executed dead toad! And like the golf, it’s all in the mind!

There are enough tutorials in books and on line to learn the technical details of hand/finger structure but to see how technical skill is transformed into divine beauty you need go no further than the Old Masters.

The following images are the hand studies for CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND:

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND hand graphite study 3.jpg

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND hand graphite study 2.jpg

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND hand graphite study 1.jpg

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND Part 1 – the focal point

Rembrandt said, “… a work of art is finished when an artist achieves his aim.” Quite so. More interesting to consider is when a work of art begins. People sometimes ask how long a certain piece has taken and the only true answer an artist can give is, “My whole life.”

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND is not quite finished. It will be shared in its entirety when the artist achieves his aim. In the meantime, here will be posted some of the sketches, preparatory studies and drawings made in developing the initial idea and in working out technical aspects of composition and execution.

Painted in watercolour on Arches cold pressed, 356gsm paper measuring 102 x 66cm (40 x 26ins), this large work will frame up into a sizeable painting.

The following images concentrate on the focal point – the subject’s face, in particular, the eyes. A sketch page of head angles is followed by graphite and colour studies.

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND face sketches graphite.jpg

 

 

 

 

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND face graphite study 3.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND face graphite study 2.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND face study graphite 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colour study

 

 

 

 

 

 

CANDLE IN THE DIVINE WIND face colour study 2.jpg